Indiana Attorney General Joins Indiana County Recorders to Fight Property Fraud

The Indiana Attorney General has joined the Indiana Recorders' Association to alert homeowners about a potential scam that could force them out of their homes. Attorney General Greg Zoeller says some Indiana citizens have fallen victim to property fraud. In most cases, it involves homes that no longer carry a mortgage. Zoeller says the perpetrators will file a deed for property that belongs to someone else. He says state law does not give Indiana County Recorders the authority to require that identification be provided when a deed is filed. Posey County Recorder Martha Breeze says in most cases, deeds arrive in the mail from title companies so asking for identification is often not an option. New software has been developed that allows citizens to be automatically notified if a deed is filed in their name. It's currently available in about 12 counties. If this technology is not being used yet in your county, officials recommend you check with your county recorder on the status of deeds in your name, about once every six months. For more information, visit www.indianacounties.org/recorders. To read associated news release, click here.

Additional Soundbites 

1) Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller says identifying information from the person or entity that files the deed is an issue. - Click here to listen.

2) Allen County Recorder John McGauley has been working with the attorney general's office on this consumer alert. McGauley explains how the crime happens. - Click here to listen. 

3) Warrick County Recorder Pat Brooks was the second County Recorder in Indiana to begin using property fraud alert software. - Click here to listen.   

4) Warrick County Pat Brooks and Allen County Recorder John McGauley explain which types of property are at risk. - Click here to listen.   

5) Lake County Recorder Mike Brown is working toward implementing property fraud alert software for the citizens of his county. - Click here to listen. 

6) State law does not require anyone filing for a deed to provide identification, but Posey County Recorder Martha Breeze explains that obtaining an I-D is often not possible. - Click here to listen.